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Duties in the Workplace

Preventing and addressing workplace sexual harassment is a responsibility that is shared by everyone in the workplace.

Employers' Duties

  • Employers are required to ensure the health, safety and welfare of their workers.
  • Employers are required, to the extent that it is reasonably practicable, to ensure that workers are not exposed to harassment in relation to their employment.
  • Employers are required to ensure that the activities of workers do not negatively affect the health, safety or welfare of other workers.

Employers in federally regulated workplaces must also ensure that the health and safety of their workers is protected and make every reasonable effort to ensure that employees are not sexually harassed.

Employers, supervisors and workers must all cooperate with anyone who is fulfilling their duties under the occupational health and safety portion of The Saskatchewan Employment Act or the Canada Labour Code.

Supervisors' Duties

  • Supervisors are responsible for ensuring the health and safety of worker’s under their direct supervision and direction.
  • Supervisors must ensure that workers under their supervision are responsible for complying with health and safety standards.
  • Supervisors are also required, to the extent that is reasonably practicable, to ensure that workers under their direct supervision and direction are not exposed to workplace harassment.

Workers' Duties

  • Workers have a duty to take reasonable care to protect their own health and safety.
  • Workers have a duty to take reasonable care to protect the health and safety of other workers who could be affected by their actions.
  • Workers must comply with health and safety standards.
  • Workers must refrain from causing or participating in the harassment of another worker.

Workers in federally regulated workplaces must also take all reasonable care to protect their own and other workers’ health and safety. Workers also have a duty to inform their employer about any situation that is likely to be hazardous to their health or safety or that of others in the workplace.

A Word about Bystanders

Workers need to keep these responsibilities in mind and make sure they are not passively participating in harassment by going along with the inappropriate behaviour of others in the workplace.

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The Shift Project is funded by the Department of Justice and delivered by the Public Legal Education Association of Saskatchewan (PLEA).