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Making a Workers' Compensation Claim

Workplace injuries must be reported immediately to your employer and to the Workers' Compensation Board (WCB).

In addition to reporting an injury to their employer and to WCB, workers should get immediate medical attention if required. They need to let their healthcare professional know it is a workplace injury so that the health care professional can report it to WCB. Workers should also ask for a written report detailing any physical restrictions they may have based on the injury.

The Workers' Initial Report of Injury form is used to report the injury to WCB. It can be filled out online or downloaded, filled out and mailed to WCB.

If You Need help

The Office of the Workers’ Advocate provides free and independent advice about WCB claims and appeals. The Fair Practices Office can also provide impartial assistance to workers who have questions or concerns about the services they received from WCB.

Appeals

If a worker disagrees with a decision regarding their claim, they have a right to appeal the decision. An Appeals Officer will consider the appeal and make a decision. If the worker disagrees with the decision of the Appeals Officer, they can appeal that matter further to the Board Appeal Tribunal. The Appeal Tribunal is the last appeal available. Workers may, however, request a medical review panel to dispute a medical position taken by the WCB. More information about the appeal process is available from WCB.

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This site provides general information about workplace sexual harassment only. It is not a substitute for receiving legal advice about your situation. Apply now to receive 4 hours of free legal advice.

The Shift Project is funded by the Department of Justice and delivered by the Public Legal Education Association of Saskatchewan (PLEA).